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Germans vs. Russians: The Origins of Chicago’s Organized Jewish Community 1859–1923

Germans vs. Russians: The Origins of Chicago’s Organized Jewish Community 1859–1923

Sunday, April 21, 2013 2:00 pm


Tobias
 Brinkmann spoke about Chicago’s Jewish community from the founding of the United Hebrew Relief Association in 1859 to the creation of Jewish Charities of Chicago in 1923, a time when organizations that served “German” (Central European) Jews merged with those that served “Russian” (Eastern European) Jews. Dr. Brinkmann's discussion assessed the highly charged conflicts between established members of the community and more recent immigrants, conflicts that had much to do with social status and assimilation and little to do with actual origins.

Dr. Tobias Brinkmann is Associate Professor of Jewish Studies and History at Penn State University. He is a member of the Academic Council of the American Jewish Historical Society and the Board of the Leo Baeck Institute in London. His most recent publication is Sundays at Sinai: A Jewish Congregation in Chicago.

Image at left

Sewing Class at the Jewish
Manual Training School
June 13, 1892, Spertus collection

The Jewish Manual Training School was established by German Jews in 1890 and championed by Rabbi Dr. Emil G. Hirsch. It provided a free education in general studies, along with vocational training and an emphasis on hygiene and good citizenship. Judge Abraham Lincoln Marovitz was a graduate.

Sponsors

This was the 2013 Horwitz Family Lecture in Jewish History, generously endowed by the Horwitz Charitable Fund.

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